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Expert Webinar: LGBT Family Building Through Surrogacy, ART, or Adoption

LGBT Family Building Through Surrogacy, ART, or Adoption Expert Webinar with Victoria T. Ferrara, Esq.

Adoption and assisted reproduction attorney Victoria T. Ferrara, Esq.

What options do gay and lesbian individuals and couples have when they’re ready to become parents, and what can they expect during the process? Which states have laws that are favorable for LGBT family building, and which present barriers? How does your state’s stance on same-sex marriage affect your legal parentage? Join adoption and assisted reproduction attorney Victoria T. Ferrara, Esq., in a free webinar to ask your questions and learn about LGBT family building options including joint or second-parent adoption, donor conception, and surrogacy.

Building Your Family’s Expert Webinar: LGBT Family Building Through Surrogacy, ART, or Adoption was held on Tuesday, July 15, 2014 from 12PM to 1PM EDT.

Listen to the LGBT family building webinar recording and view Victoria Ferrara’s slide presentation now ►

Victoria T. Ferrara, Esq., has been practicing law for the past 24 years. She is the founder and managing partner of the Law Firm of Victoria T. Ferrara, P.C., which has a focus on assisted reproductive technology law and family law. Ferrara also owns and operates a surrogacy matching agency, Worldwide Surrogacy Specialists, LLC. One of her achievements is the landmark decision of Raftopol v. Ramey, 12 A.3d 783 299 Conn. 681 (2011), a Connecticut Supreme Court case that essentially created a new way to establish legal parentage in Connecticut, i.e., by being a party (Intended Parent) to a valid gestational agreement regardless of genetic connection to the child to be born to the gestational surrogate.

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Expert Webinar: LGBT Family Building Through Surrogacy, ART, or Adoption Reviewed by on . [caption id="attachment_4584" align="alignleft" width="160"] Adoption and assisted reproduction attorney Victoria T. Ferrara, Esq.[/caption] What options do gay [caption id="attachment_4584" align="alignleft" width="160"] Adoption and assisted reproduction attorney Victoria T. Ferrara, Esq.[/caption] What options do gay Rating: 0

Comments (11)

  • JessicaJo

    My partner and I are interested in me carrying her fertilized egg by donor sperm. Are you familiar with the costs involved in the process and what legal rights to the child would I have?

    Also, does insurance pay for any of the process?

  • ronz

    In NYS, my relative is a lesbian and I am a gay man. My relative and her partner are willing to carry children as long as me and my partner are the donor sperm. One of the children (my partner sperm and my relatives egg) would be our child and the other would be their child. Can we do this legally without using a lawyer? If we don’t pay for a lawyer, what are the risks?

    • Vincent

      Holiday,Even when you try to apologize, you still throw a jab! You don’t get it. You keep snaiyg, try to have kids young. Many of us have been there and done that over and over and it isn’t that simple. If it was, there wouldn’t be issues and struggles. People can’t snap their fingers and have children. People can’t snap their fingers and find a partner. I have not seen people on this page bash young mothers to any degree that later in life mothers are bashed. Which to me makes no sense ..because young mothers make that choice, while a majority of later in life mothers do not chose to wait to be parents.

  • JT

    We live in the Fort Myers, Fl area and would like to know if there are any agencies in our area that work with gay and lesbian couples. Thank you for your help!!!

    • Cade

      It’s about time sonemoe wrote about this.

  • shannonlusk

    What options does one have when they have a known donor who won’t sign over his rights with the child already born.

  • dj

    I have heard that a new development in stem cell research in Japan, has led to being able to use one man’s DNA to create an egg and his partner’s too fertilize it. Is this true?

    • Emily

      So glad this is becoming an open topic. To addsres annie s comment, it’s not guilt. It’s a desire to have a child and the heartbreak of not being able to conceive naturally and to go through medical intervention which is as Elisabeth states, an absolute roller coaster ride. There are no words to express the emotional ride this can take- I speak from experience. Trying to express it verbally often results in someone taking something the wrong way which cycles back to not wanting to discuss it at all. Thank goodness more and more women are opening up about this. It happens, it’s no one’s fault and there are now ways to fulfill the desire to have a child. Now if we could only get insurance companies to pay for it!!!!!!

  • Ashly Guyton

    What are some of the laws in Michigan in relation to this subject?
    What are some resources in Michigan?

    • Lindorite

      Beautifully written story, Elisabeth is a woman of many taetnls. As a woman who has chosen to not have children, and who has no regrets about that decision, I can’t relate to the depth of desire to have a child that begins the difficult journey some infertile couples take to attain a pregnancy. What I can relate to is the judgmental response society has towards such couple, which I find to be shallow at the very least. I admire couples (or women alone) who want a child so badly that they will go through the indignity, uncertainty and expense of fertility treatments in order to have that child. It seems to me such people should be celebrated for their willingness to go through so much in order to have a family, and if they succeed you know that child will be loved thoroughly and completely. How can that be a problem for anyone?

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