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Connecticut Adoption Laws and Professionals

As a Connecticut resident who’s interested in adopting, you have many adoption options, and this is the perfect place to begin exploring them. Below, you’ll find adoption agencies and adoption lawyers offering services in your state. Scroll past the listings to see Connecticut adoption laws and policies.

CONNECTICUT ADOPTION LAWS & STATUTES

Each state maintains its own adoption policies, so the process can vary considerably for families, from state to state. Learn about Connecticut’s state adoption statutes and legal requirements, whether you’re adopting a newborn through domestic, private adoption, an infant or older child from U.S. foster care adoption, or an infant, toddler, or older child through international adoption. Find answers to the most common questions about adopting in Connecticut.

WHO CAN ADOPT IN CONNECTICUT?

Any adult may adopt, but the sexual orientation may be considered when placing a child as the state is not required to place a child with a homosexual or bisexual individual, and a married couple must adopt jointly unless an exception is made by the court.

Continue reading “Connecticut Adoption Laws and Professionals” on AdoptiveFamilies.com.

Comments (5)

  • Bincol

    Wonderful blog, thanks to Elisabeth for shanirg her story! I can really relate to her feelings of shock when finding out something that seems so natural, having children, appears not to be so easy and natural at all. Growing up always wanting to have kids, and finding myself surrounded by friends and family who only had so much as to blink to have children, the thought that it might not actually work for us never really crossed my mind! Until we find ourselves a good 2 years down the line of first cautious attempts, and nothing seems to be happening and first test results don’t seem to be looking too good either. I have no idea what will happen in the next few months, but one thing my husband and I keep telling each other is to take it all one step at a time, and only take it as far as BOTH of us feel comfortable with. We like to compare our family situation to building a house: our mutual love, the reason we got married, is the foundation. And it’s rock solid. If we are blessed enough to be able to built on those foundations, we’ll be extatic. But the bricks should never become so heavy that it makes the foundations break up. What good would a child be if the process of receiving him/her wrecks us? What good would we, a divorced set of parents, be to our child? The constant reflection and heartfelt conversations we have with each other give us a lot of strength and positive energy when we need it most. And that’s something I sincerely wish to all of you out there going through the same emotional rollercoaster as us. Hang in there!

  • Dean Edward Husted

    I would like to receive info on my rites to search for my birth parents

  • Jewles77

    ok I have legal custody of my two daughters, their fathers never signed their birth certificates, paternity has never been established, what do my fiance and I have to do for him to adopt my daughters since we will be getting married in the next year? the laws are very confusing and he has been in their lives the past four years, my daughters are teenagers and have said they want him to adopt them. what steps do we have to take in order to get this accomplished? Thanks

  • rkoza9596

    My husband and I have been married for quite a while now, and it seems that nothing we do is deemed good enough for us to be able to either have a child biologically, or even adopt. We did attempt adoption through our state child welfare agency. We got through to the home-study, and then less than a week later, we got a notice in the mail saying we were being denied. Out of all the people at the initial meeting, we were the only ones not approved. When we were asked if we were willing to go to therapy, move into a bigger place, we said yes, and then the denial. It really feels personal. When I tried to contact the commissioner of that agency, wanting to know exactly WHY we were denied, my query went unanswered. What can we do? Just try again? What can we do if we keep getting denied?

  • Karen peck

    Would love to adopt a child

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