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Personal Story: “Honoring My Ethiopian Daughters’ Heritage”

Personal Story: “Honoring My Ethiopian Daughters’ Heritage”

An adoptive mother finds her way, parenting two girls whose stories are distinctly different from most other African-American children they meet.

By Rita Radostitz

My daughters have caramel brown skin, dark brown eyes, and tightly curled black hair. They are African by birth, American by citizenship, but have always self-identified as Habesha (the Amharic word for Ethiopian). Two-and-a-half years ago, these eight-year-old twins left everything familiar and came to America to learn a new language, a new culture, a new family’s ways. Because of their history—and the long history of their people—they fit in differently in our society. Even though they have brown skin, and were adopted, they have little in common with the other African-American girl in their class, a native English speaker adopted by white parents as an infant.

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Personal Story: “Honoring My Ethiopian Daughters’ Heritage” Reviewed by on . An adoptive mother finds her way, parenting two girls whose stories are distinctly different from most other African-American children they meet. By Rita Radost An adoptive mother finds her way, parenting two girls whose stories are distinctly different from most other African-American children they meet. By Rita Radost Rating: 0

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