Home » Adoption » Independent Adoption: Risks, Benefits, and How It Works
Independent Adoption: Risks, Benefits, and How It Works

Independent Adoption: Risks, Benefits, and How It Works

Thousands of newborns are placed each year through independent adoption. You’ll need an experienced attorney to guide your way.

By Mark McDermott

In a private or independent adoption, prospective adoptive parents are advised by an adoption attorney, instead of working with an adoption agency. This form of adoption is specifically authorized by law in all states except Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware,  Massachusetts, and North Dakota. Because adoption is, for the most part, controlled by state law, aspects of independent adoption vary from state to state, and you’ll want to engage an experienced adoption attorney who is knowledgeable about the differing requirements and adoption laws in your state.

In a typical independent adoption, the prospective parents take an active role in identifying a birth mother, usually by networking, advertising, or by using the Internet…

Continue reading “Independent Adoption: Risks, Benefits, and How it Works” on AdoptiveFamilies.com.

 

Independent Adoption: Risks, Benefits, and How It Works Reviewed by on . Thousands of newborns are placed each year through independent adoption. You'll need an experienced attorney to guide your way. By Mark McDermott [divide style= Thousands of newborns are placed each year through independent adoption. You'll need an experienced attorney to guide your way. By Mark McDermott [divide style= Rating: 0
Advertisement
scroll to top