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How Do I Find My Domestic Adoption Team?

How Do I Find My Domestic Adoption Team?

You’ve decided to adopt in the U.S., but how do you find your domestic adoption agency or attorney? A lawyer describes the services each tends to offer.

BY JANNA J. ANNEST, J.D.

Adoption is a team sport, regardless of how you choose to adopt. You might already know a particular player you want involved in the process–for example, an agency recommended by a friend, or a lawyer used by a family member–and your desire to work with them may determine your route to adoption. Or you might have decided on private adoption, and need to assemble the necessary players.

Who should be on your roster? When it comes to a domestic adoption, the first fork in the road is deciding on independent vs agency adoption–whether to work on your own or with an organization. (A few states have made the choice for you by outlawing private adoptions.) The type of adoption you pursue, and your own preferences, will determine how you assemble your team…

Continue reading “How Do I Find My Domestic Adoption Team?” on AdoptiveFamilies.com.

How Do I Find My Domestic Adoption Team? Reviewed by on . You've decided to adopt in the U.S., but how do you find your domestic adoption agency or attorney? A lawyer describes the services each tends to offer. BY JANN You've decided to adopt in the U.S., but how do you find your domestic adoption agency or attorney? A lawyer describes the services each tends to offer. BY JANN Rating: 0

About Janna J. Annest, J.D.

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Janna J. Annest is an adoptive mom through domestic adoption and an adoption attorney at Mills Meyers Swartling, in Seattle, Washington.

Comments (5)

  • myadoptionadvisor

    This is a helpful article. I’d like to clarify one aspect of it so readers don’t make an incorrect inference.

    The article states the following: “Independent adopters decide where and how to locate a potential birth mother, and deal directly with her. They can decide what type of expenses they are willing to pay, and what type of relationship they want with her, both before and after the delivery.”

    Although the author is not stating this, one could infer from the quote above that adopting parents that work with an agency CANNOT locate potential birth parents on their own, CANNOT work with them directly, CANNOT decide which expenses to cover, and CANNOT determine the type of ongoing relationship they want with the birth parents. Although some agencies may not allow adopting parents to do some of these things (in which case I would encourage the adopting parents to learn about other agencies), that is the exception.

    We work with hundreds of adopting parents each year who are working with a “full-service” agency and are also doing their own outreach to complement their agency’s efforts. In fact, the majority of our clients are REQUIRED BY THEIR AGENCY to work with us.

    These progressive agencies are seeing fewer expectant parents walk in their door because, in large part, Millennials are learning about adoption and looking for adopting parents online. As a result, these agencies empower adopting parents to take a more active role in their process. The adopting parents get the support of the agency while also retaining the power to perform some of the most important parts of the process on their own (actually, in concert with their agency more than on their own).

    Our consulting firm (we are consultants and not social workers, attorneys, or facilitators) becomes an extension to their program.

    As the article states, both the independent route and agency route provide great paths for adopting parents, but adopting parents may miss opportunities to connect with their future child’s birth parents if they don’t explore the space between these two options.

  • Judith Bell

    “Adoption” word itself has a very deep and valuable meaning. Adoption is possible only if the person handling it know how to love care and understand a child. Having a right team for your adoption agency is very much important as it can built you reputation whereas can spoil too. In case, you are not finding a right team, you can join hand with other right adoption agency as the motive is same to provide home to children who are waiting for parent love.

  • Anny

    Thanks for sharing your story. I was doisnaged with Endometriosis a year ago and have been dealing with two very large endometriomas on both both of my ovaries. I have seen a few dr’s and they all say the only the only way I will ever get pregnant is by IVF. Reading your blog and seeing that there is so many women out there that suffer from the same condition. It feels good to know your not alone. Thanks again!

  • Braden Bills

    I’ve been trying to figure out what I can do to get an adoption. I didn’t know that it was a good idea to get a team! It makes sense that you would need one, considering the roster used. Thank you for sharing!

  • Jamie moore

    I am a thirty year old female that has a child in Louisiana. I wanted to know how reconnect with her ? My rights were terminated and she is still young I just want her to know , when she is olde”I truly apologize for not doing what it took to be there as a mother should be . I know she is happy with the family she is with . And with every ounce of breath I take the last thing I want to do is confuse her . I am currently not part of her life but I would love to be . I just feel that I have to respect the families she has been with , because they have been so good to her .. Just know that I ,”Jamie Moore . Am here when y’all feel the time is right .. Thank you’ll for being her Guider, , Mother , Father Protectet. All said … Everything that a child needs.Sincerely Ms. Moore

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